Ohio States Braxton Miller reportedly out for season

OSU senior quarterback Braxton Miller warms up for the first session of fall practice Aug. 4 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center in Columbus. Miller missed the entirety of spring practice after undergoing shoulder surgery.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorOhio State senior quarterback Braxton Miller is expected to miss the entire 2014 season after re-injuring his shoulder Monday, according to a Tuesday afternoon ESPN report.Miller, expected to be a Heisman Trophy candidate this season, re-injured his throwing shoulder at practice Monday afternoon, a source close to the team told Lantern TV.According to the source, the team had not yet been informed of Miller’s status as of early Tuesday afternoon.He originally injured the shoulder last season in OSU’s loss to Clemson in the Orange Bowl. After undergoing offseason shoulder surgery, Miller was held out of spring practice and limited through the first portion of fall practice.OSU co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman said Miller was held out of the throwing portions of a Monday morning practice, but was expected to through in the afternoon. That second session was when Miller re-injured his shoulder while throwing the ball.In between practices, Miller said he was “100 percent,” despite experiencing muscle soreness stemming from the shoulder surgery throughout camp.Miller, a native of Huber Heights, Ohio, missed two full games and most of a third in 2013 as a junior. Then-backup Kenny Guiton replaced him and led the Buckeyes to three wins.On Saturday, OSU coach Urban Meyer said redshirt-freshman J.T. Barrett had moved ahead of redshirt-sophomore Cardale Jones in the team’s backup quarterback battle. Herman said the OSU offense has moved the ball better when Barrett is on the field, as opposed to Jones, so far in fall camp.Barrett’s only experience for the Scarlet and Gray outside of practice came in OSU’s 2014 Spring Game when he finished 17 of 33 on pass attempts and racked up 151 yards through the air.OSU’s 2014 season is scheduled to begin at noon Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. read more

Ohio State mens soccer to host NCAA tournament clash with Akron

Senior midfielder Yianni Sarris (left) fights for a header during a game against Akron on Sept. 24 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 3-1.Credit: Ben Jackson / For The LanternAppearing in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2010, the Ohio State men’s soccer team knows that one slip up could mark the end of the road.However, the team has embraced that mindset, junior midfielder Zach Mason said.“It feels a little bit different, because you know these games are the most important, this is what you play the whole regular season for, train in the preseason for,” the co-captain said. “They’re huge. So, you get up a little bit more for these.”OSU (9-7-4) is set for a rematch with Akron for its first-round matchup. Akron defeated OSU back on Sept. 24, 3-1.OSU coach John Bluem said despite the result from the first meeting, the Zips will be seeing a different OSU team Thursday.“I think we’re playing better as a team now than we were at that point in time,” Bluem said. “I think we’re defending better than we did at that point in time, so those are things that should help us help us a little bit in this game.”Senior midfielder Yianni Sarris said he agreed with his coach’s thoughts.“We dropped the first one, which was unfortunate on our part, but we grew as a team, and we’re definitely a stronger and better team now,” Sarris said.Sarris said every player has developed and gotten better “in their own way” as the season progressed.Bluem said that Akron (13-6-1) does possess one advantage that the Buckeyes cannot account for: experience.“(Experience is) certainly something that works to their favor,” Bluem said. “They have a lot of guys that have NCAA Tournament experience, and we have nobody.”The Zips are appearing in the tournament for the 10th consecutive season. That includes a 2010 season that saw Akron hoist the national championship trophy for the first time in school history after defeating Louisville in the title game.On the other side, only one player on OSU’s roster has ever appeared in an NCAA Tournament game: senior midfielder Yianni Sarris, in his lone season at Florida Gulf Coast as a freshman.However, Sarris said his experience from three years ago is incomparable to how he feels about OSU going dancing this season, because of the connection he feels with his current teammates.“It’s very nice to be back,” Sarris said. “I really wanted to do it with this squad. I mean, this squad is my family, this is my brotherhood.”The Zips — the Mid-American Conference champions — boast a strong attack that is led by sophomore midfielder Adam Najem, who is tied for fourth in the nation with 13 goals this season.One of those came in Akron’s regular season victory in Columbus, a header in the 76th minute that found the back of the net for the third and final Zips goal that evening.Bluem said OSU is in good shape for the rematch, simply because Akron has already defeated the Buckeyes this year.“I would say the biggest advantage is that they beat us the first time,” the 2014 Big Ten Coach of the Year said. “It’s difficult to beat a team twice in one season. Our guys are going to be excited to play the game, not only because it’s an NCAA Tournament game, but because it’s a chance to get back at a team that beat you.”Another factor the players and coaches are thinking about in advance of the game is the weather forecast for Thursday evening.According to the Weather Channel, the forecast for the start of the game at 5 p.m. is about 25 degrees, with winds blowing between 10 and 15 mph.Mason said tackling the cold weather head-on is something that the team will need to carefully plan out.“In these conditions, it’s a mental game,” Mason said. “You have to understand that it’s going to be cold, and just get over it, really.”OSU and Akron met in the second round of the NCAA Tournament in 2008, with Akron winning, 1-0, in double overtime. That was the only postseason matchup between the schools, though they have met 38 times overall, with Akron dominating the all-time series, 28-6-3.The winner of the game will advance to South Bend, Ind., to take on the defending champions and No. 1 seed in the tournament, Notre Dame, on Sunday.OSU’s first-round matchup against Akron is scheduled to kick off at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at 5 p.m. read more

Musthave flight essentials for stressfree travel

first_imgIts that time of the year when people take a break and plan a summer vacation. Be it preparing for a long international trip or short domestic one, make sure to have some checked luggage essentials for a comfortable and hassle-free flight.Here are some flight essentials that should be part of your luggage as you plan your vacation:Eye masks and ear buds: These days travelling can be quite hectic. What better way than dozing off to your dreamland while flying over the clouds and no phone calls, messages or mails to disturb you? To do so, nothing works better than an eye mask and comfortable ear plugs. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfMagazines and books: While everyone dreads long flights, it is actually a great opportunity to catch up on reading. Rather than just bringing along one magazine or a book, make sure to pack a couple extras to help prevent boredom in the event of a missed connection or an onboard entertainment system that is malfunctioning. Just avoid buying them at the airport if you can, since these items can be rather pricey.A travel pillow: Whether you’ve booked an overnight flight or just want to avoid arriving at your destination with a sore neck, you can’t go wrong by packing a compact travel pillow. Many brands are available in the market which provide comfort in quite an affordable range.Hygiene wipes and essentials: A must on every travellers list. You never know where you might have to use one – public restrooms are often dirty and unhygienic, with toilet seats and other surfaces carrying a host of bacteria. To avoid UTI, make sure you carry hygiene wipes and toilet seat sprays along with hand sanitizers.last_img read more

Culinary contributions of British raj

first_imgSo we’ve just celebrated our 70th Republic Day with unprecedented grandeur, pride and dignity. The British, as we all know, ruled India for almost two centuries and had an overwhelming impact on the economic, political and social structure of the country. There was no facet of life of ordinary Indians that remained untouched or unaffected by British rule and the impact is being felt to this day.Apart from the overall impact on the culture of the country, the British also introduced many culinary novelties to the country and in time an entirely new cuisine was developed which we now know as the Anglo- Indian cuisine. Although not extremely popular, this cuisine has its own unique characteristics and complexities which is understandable considering the fact that it married two cuisines that had nothing in common, not even by far. Legend has it that the Anglo Indian cuisine was developed when the British women, the wives of the officers of the crown interacted with their domestic helps and cooks who were always Indian. The unusual concoctions resulting out of these interactions took some getting used to some of the times and didn’t become runaway successes while some others are among the best known global dishes from the subcontinent. In this article let us try and analyse some of the best known and accepted Anglo Indian dishes that became an intrinsic part of the cuisine of India. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe ingredients So there is no easy way to say this but most ‘authentic’ Indian food that we swear by today, be it the luscious aaloo dum the tomato chutney, the quintessential gajar halva or even the ultimate comfort food the sandwich simply did not exist before the British arrived in the country. The reason is simple, we in India neither had seen the Potato (which was brought by the Portuguese but the British helped popularise it), nor the tomato, cauliflower, orange carrot and more that completely changed the way we ate ever since. It can’t be emphasised enough that many of these ingredients went on to create dishes that define the Indian cuisine the way we see it today. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe Loaf Can anyone among us imagine our life without the bread? Well except if you are a Bollywood A-lister that has been advised against bulking up and told that bread is the culprit. Bread was a gift of the British to India. Like most other British culinary imports which didn’t really make a big difference in the cuisine of the people from the poorer classes but had a tremendous impact on the newly minted, educated, middle and upper middle classes, the bread just took the country by storm and to this day remains one of the most popular staples in our cities and towns. So much so, that the ‘double roti’ also was used in many dishes such as bread pakora or shahi tukda that took the humble bread loaf to another culinary pinnacle. The Curry If you travel to the US, most Indian food joints are called ‘Curry houses’ and most Indian gravies are simply called curries. Ironic since before the British came, we did not have a curry, certainly not the way the British envisaged it. The word curry, although said to have a South Indian origin, the curry itself is more of a British concept of a ‘spiced sauce’ than an intricate flavourful base that the Indian gravies really are. Similarly, the curry powder is also a British construct to preprepare a balanced mix of many spices that went into making a curry and to tone it down a bit so that it is palatable to their mild palates. So the curry – the most basic of Indian culinary component, the everyday meal to almost everybody, is a British invention. The Chutney Although the word chutney derives from the Hindi word ‘to lick’, the way the world sees chutney today is actually an Anglo Indian concept. Back in the day, the British thought it would be a good idea to use some of the Indian spices, jaggery, vinegar and use the concoction to preserve their native fruits such as apples, rhubarb or pears and make a relish that they can enjoy the year around. They decided to call it chutney since it basically tried to imitate its fiery, simple, savoury original that was popular in India, prepared fresh, tangy and spicy and generally served with meals as an accompaniment. The Chai It’s impossible to imagine that we live in the world’s largest consumer country of tea. But do you know it was brought to us by the British? In India, there was no concept of tea drinking before the mid-1800s when the British thought it could be a profitable venture to establish some tea gardens and introduce tea as a beverage to the Indians. The British themselves were quite fond of tea and wanted to overthrow the Chinese monopoly on tea trade after finding out how Indian climate was extremely conducive and the soil perfect for growing tea. The tea was paired with biscuit, another import of the British India and even to this day millions of Indians start their day with chai – biskoot. The Sandwich Another significant historical figure in the Britisher’s culinary contribution to India was the British aristocrat John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, a town in Kent, UK who popularised the ‘Bread and a Filling’ innovation to a level where it is today among the most eaten food dishes in the world. To put things in context, Americans alone eat more than 300 million sandwiches a day almost equal to their whole population. In India, sandwiches made a significant impact on the local food offering, especially the snack time foods in the major towns. In Bombay Pao bhaji, vada pao and the ubiquitous Bombay Toast became popular and are among the most popular food of local Bombay street food culture today. Highness Although it is inarguable that the overall influence of the British colonialism on the Indian cuisine was far lesser when compared to the Mughals for example, it still was significant and had an immense impact on the culinary habits of the populace, predominantly on those who lived in cities and towns. To complete this column, let me leave you with a colonial recipe.RECIPE BOMBAY CHUTNEY SANDWICH Ingredients Bread Slices: 3 Potato: 1 medium (boiled and cut into roundels) Tomato: 1 (cut into roundels) Cucumber: Few slices Capsicum: Few roundels Grated Cheese: 50 gm Butter: 10 gm Green chutney: 20 gm Chat Masala: few pinches Method Butter the bread slices generously. Spread chutney on the inside of each slice. To assemble, lay one slice of bread, spread boiled potato and capsicum, sprinkle chat masala on the top. Put the middle bread layer and spread tomato, cucumber and cheese. Add more chat masala and cover it with the final layer of bread. Grill the sandwich in a sandwich griller or toast in a sandwich toaster. Serve hot with tomato ketchup.last_img read more