Video: Environmental issues and the Anglican Communion

first_img Comments (2) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Anglican Consultative Council, Submit an Event Listing Walter L Johnson says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ April 14, 2016 at 9:58 am I thought the video was informative and thought provoking. What is the average person or parish to do next? Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 ACC16, Advocacy Peace & Justice, Video: Environmental issues and the Anglican Communion Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change, Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY April 21, 2016 at 5:40 pm Thank you for this inspirational video. I’m especially grateful for the young people who remind us in no uncertain terms that the Bible makes it clear that we are responsible for the future of our island planet.I have been involved in a number of social justice issues, but I think this is the most important one, especially for our poorer fellow world dwellers who don’t have many options. We own it to them to reduce their losses. We must reduce our carbon footprints !!!Walter Johnson, Holy Faith Episcopal Church, Inglewood, CA. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Matthew DaviesPosted Apr 13, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY McKinley Walker says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Video Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Barron Trump to attend Maryland’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in…

first_img Josh Thomas says: By ENS staffPosted May 15, 2017 May 15, 2017 at 2:48 pm I hope the boy is allowed to attend school without protesters or tabloid photographers hounding him. Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (23) May 16, 2017 at 10:48 am When I thought more last night about why I couldn’t really understand the newsworthiness of this notice, I had a clarifying thought and so I am posting it here for what it is worth. It feels to me as though a denomination that is doing a lot to distance itself from its identity as an enclave for privileged persons historically, should be aware that this feeds into a nostalgia for the privileged past by being able to say that the President was married in an Episcopal parish and now his son is attending an Episcopal parochial school. I have this thought at the exact same time as I agree very much with the thoughtful and gracious comment of persons such as Joanne Sanders. In my case, I think both things simultaneously. . . . . . May 15, 2017 at 7:25 pm Bob, it’s not about Trump. It’s about the boy. Why is your dislike for the parents/ family transferred to Barron. President Donald Trump points to his son Barron while watching the inaugural parade Jan. 20, 2017, with first lady Melania Trump in Washington, D.C. Photo: REUTERS/Carlos Barria[Episcopal News Service] Barron Trump, President Donald Trump’s youngest child, will attend St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland, this fall.Barron Trump, 11, will move to Washington, D.C., from New York with his mother, first lady Melania Trump, at some point after he finishes the current school year at Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. He is believed to be in fifth grade.St. Andrew’s Head of School Robert Kosasky and Rodney Glasgow, head of the middle school and chief diversity officer, wrote a letter to St. Andrew’s families confirming that the young Trump will become a member of the Class of 2024, CNN reported.The Washington Post reported that the White House wanted to announce the news in the summer after St. Andrew’s ended the academic year, in part out of concern that the school might become that site of protest. However, parents started to ask questions when rumors began to circulate and the school decided to confirm Barron Trump’s enrollment. CNN reported that the school had the Trump family’s permission to do so.Melania Trump said in a statement after the announcement that the family is “very excited” to have Barron Trump attend a school that she said is “known for its diverse community and commitment to academic excellence.” She said the school’s mission “to know and inspire each child in an inclusive community dedicated to exceptional teaching, learning and service” appealed to the family.Donald Trump was raised Presbyterian. Barron Trump was baptized in December 2006 at the Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Florida, the same church where his parents married on Jan. 22, 2005.St. Andrew’s, about 20 miles north of the White House, was founded in 1978 and has 580 students in grades six through 12. It has a median class size of 15 and a 7:1 student to teacher ratio, according to information on the school’s website. Tuition is just less than $40,000 for students in grades six through eight.The school has the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning, which says its priority is to “ensure that 100 percent of St. Andrew’s pre-school through 12th grade teachers receive training and ongoing professional development (every school year) in mind, brain, and education science, the most innovative thinking being applied to enhancing teacher quality and student achievement today.” Tags May 17, 2017 at 6:02 pm Caveat to the above(my initial response) thusly and firstly: what a welcome exchange/dialogue on this notice. And secondly but importantly the choices were out there prominently: 1) Charter Schools promoted by Betsy Devos,U.S.Secretary of Education; 2)Evangelical fundamental Christian school in the VP Mike Pence and Rev.Franklin/late Billy Graham tradition; and/or 3) Father’s military academy training/education in his youth…Upon this reflection where such a “presidential” family is so blessed with so many exceptional opportunities for their precious young son, let us all be Thankful for this choice… and with the hope that he/they may continue with his education/stability through the years to graduation!Again Mary, please keep us informed as to progress on this important issue.It is gratifying that we are all able to come together sharing our concerns and perspectives.Blessings and Peace be with us All. Joanne Sanders says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Pjcabbiness says: Rector Knoxville, TN May 15, 2017 at 6:04 pm I agree with you completely. I dislike the president intensely, but minor children are off limits, and the other children and parents of the school should be as well. I wish the boy much success in school. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK May 15, 2017 at 9:01 pm I always appreciate the generosity by which many of my fellow Episcopalians respond to such news. I do agree that Barron Trump should be treated with dignity, respect and kindness like any student would deserve, And perhaps most importantly that St Andrews will provide persons with characteristics of integrity, fairness, decency, respect, generosity, intellect, grace, honesty – there are countless more any of us could list – as essential role models in his life. I will leave it at that. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 15, 2017 at 4:07 pm Just what I needed in my inbox, “Trump & Episcopal” together in ENS’ lead headline. Is this something we’re supposed to be proud of?The kid’s father staged his 3rd wedding at an Episcopal church in Florida; it doesn’t seem to have done him much good. Barron Trump to attend Maryland’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in the fall May 15, 2017 at 4:08 pm Glory Be and Hallelujah! Yes Melania exercised her Mother’s voice for the Best for her son Barron! She has more maturity/wisdom than many may imagine… and yes it is reassuring and interesting history re the early Episcopal connection… And of course as an almost “cradle to grave” Episcopalian I must reflect this bias although I am historically the First Daughter of Norwegian Immigrant(Lutheran initially) then my Viking Father’s leadership in Wisconsin(Grace Cathedral,then Dean John Patterson)… this may progress to a more humane, spiritual path for all of us — and of course again I am reflecting my optimistic spirit…And my favorite scriptural passage thusly, “God works in mysterious ways” and every day we are so blessed with these unexpected developments and signs …Mary, with appreciation, we are all looking forward to more notices of progress… Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL May 19, 2017 at 12:01 am So happy for the whole Trump family, especially Barron. St. Andrew’s was a good choice and hopefully the parents/children will be “tolerant” to such a sweet boy. I voted Trump/Pence and am an Episcopalian. I know there are many of us out there! It’s just “funny” that the new Episcopalians want everyone to be tolerant unless we don’t agree with their issues. Very disappointing. I go to my local Church, but do not listen to anything coming from the Bishops, etc. They have gone astray sadly. God bless the Trumps and Barron. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Jennifer Monroe says: Rector Collierville, TN May 15, 2017 at 8:31 pm Maybe the wisdom found in the words of our beautiful faith will find their way to the POTUS. Children can be wonderful evangelists. Sarah Rachel says: Dan C Hoffman says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Doug Desper says: Pam Payne says: June 5, 2017 at 1:57 pm Maybe because his father is not a shining example of being a Christian. Admitted adultery, multiple marriages, cheating people in unscrupulous business dealings, insults to war heroes, women and the handicapped, calling large groups of one race criminals, inciting hatred. I could go on and on. Patrick Andersen says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Sarah Rachel says: David Huff says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Donald Trump May 15, 2017 at 4:55 pm Josh, why is this a problem for you? Doesn’t the Episcopal Church welcome everyone? Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 20, 2017 at 3:32 pm I am glad Barron Trump will have the opportunity to attend what is likely a very good school and hopefully one which is truly open, accepting, and affirming. However, I am not quite sure why this should be considered a news item for the Episcopal News Service. It shouldn’t be for any other journalistic news source/outlet, either, for that matter (in my opinion). I did notice the article says: “St. Andrew’s, about 20 miles north of the White House, was founded in 1978 and has 580 students in grades six through 12.” However, it also states its Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning priority is to “ensure (that) 100 percent of St. Andrew’s pre-school through 12th grade teachers receive training and ongoing professional development…” So, I’m wondering how many teachers and students in pre-school through fifth grade the school has and just what they do. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA May 15, 2017 at 6:30 pm Yes, Bill, we do welcome everyone; however, we also think ‘everyone’ should have a commitment to responsible life management. Trump is very happy with his conduct, which gets noticed, so your defense, while meritorious, is probably a moot issue to Trump/ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 15, 2017 at 2:45 pm Outstanding! We wish him well at this terrific school. May 15, 2017 at 3:34 pm Is this even news? Dr. Erna Lund says: May 16, 2017 at 12:44 pm Noreen: I wonder if sadness was aroused when Mr. & Mrs. Obama sent their children to the highly selective Sidwell Friends School at a cost of $34,000 each per year? The Bidens ensured that their grandchildren attended there as well. You can decide who gets the “breaks” also considering that Mr. Obama just made $400,000 for giving a speech in the financial world. It seems that Sasha and Malia are none the worse for living around these adults who had very complicated if not clouded lives. Barron’s tuition will be about $38,000 a year. What parent doesn’t want their child to be better than they are? Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Dan C Hoffman says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA May 16, 2017 at 2:31 pm This is great news. Barron deserves a loving school community to find refuge from the media bullies trying to bring down his father and family. The Episcopal school will give him a foundation to build his life on and that is not a bad thing. I support the President and First Lady in this decision. Barron will make many new friends. To remind those who find fault in President Trump:“God is watching usGod is watching usGod is watching us from a distanceFrom a distance you look like my friendEven though we are at warFrom a distance I just cannot comprehendWhat all this fightings for” Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Rector Shreveport, LA May 15, 2017 at 8:55 pm Josh: Just out of respecting the dignity of all people, please note that “the kid” (as you refer to him) is an 11 year old child who was baptized in 2006 in the Episcopal Church and his name is Barron. That his parents are hated widely by liberal-minded Christians who flatter themselves about their walk with God is a rich topic for another place. It appears that these “horrible people” made a wise choice to have Barron educated in what we can hope to be a Christian setting. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Steve Catanich says: Rick Spring says: Bob Scruggs says: Michele Smith says: Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA May 20, 2017 at 4:07 pm How did you come to feel: “It’s just “funny” that the new Episcopalians want everyone to be tolerant unless we don’t agree with their issues.” yet were still able to cast a vote for President Trump and Vice President Pence who appear to be very intolerant of anyone who does not agree with them or does not believe as they believe? They both, but most especially Vice President Pence, have made statements indicating they probably do not understand (or do not care about) the non-establishment of religion clause in the First Amendment to the Constitution to the United States of America. I believe they, again, primarily Vice President Pence, appear to support, have proposed, enacted (or tried to enact/sign) laws most likely unconstitutional under the non-establishment of religion clause of that First Amendment. You seem to be saying everyone (including Episcopalians and most especially “new” Episcopalians) must be tolerant but the President and Vice President of the United States of America don’t have to be tolerant of all country’s citizens. I believe tolerance is not the minimum standard, acceptance is the minimum standard. This means, to me, I must accept your choice (not just your legal right) to show your support for national leaders who are unable to reciprocate by showing acceptance of others or our rule of law. I also must accept your choice (not just your right) to ignore “anything coming from the Bishops, etc. They have gone astray sadly.” I am trying to make more and more steps toward being more Christ like. Rector Albany, NY Dr. Erna Lund says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bill Louis says: May 15, 2017 at 3:18 pm I also hope Barron is able to attend school without the things Patrick mentioned above. I am in *no way* a supporter of Pres. Trump, but the minor children of politicians should be off limits for such things… Bill Louis says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Doug Desper says: Rick Spring says: Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group May 15, 2017 at 3:51 pm Absolutely. He should be allowed the privacy to grow up as normally as possible. The press has mostly done this for the Obama Daughters, Chelsea Clinton, and Amy Carter and I hope that the same courtesy will be extended to Barron Trump. May 20, 2017 at 4:56 pm Rick Spring – we are a gay family and we also believe in separation of Church and State. The media has been against our new POTUS and still is. Obama and Hillary have done far worse things than DJT have done, but the media looked the other way. I’m concerned if the country does not let our POTUS govern, we will become a Socialist State . Obama is pulling the strings to create anarchy which is in the Communist playbook of “step one”. I also feel the VP is a strong leader and seasoned politician, so he is a great asset. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Six decades after it closed, a Bristol church will re-open…

first_img Posted Jan 16, 2018 Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Six decades after it closed, a Bristol church will re-open as youth mission resource center Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Anglican Communion News Service] A church in the center of the west of England port city of Bristol is to re-open 65 years after it was closed. Once it re-opens in the Autumn, St Nicholas’ Church will focus on engaging with young people who don’t currently go to church, and will act as what the diocese is calling a “Resourcing Church,” serving the wider city and assisting future church plants. It will be led by the Rev. Toby Flint, currently the lead pastor at London’s Holy Trinity Brompton, home of the Alpha Course and a significant participant in church plants.Read the entire article here. Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Church of England takes modern slavery fight into classrooms

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Oct 22, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of England’s Clewer Initiative is taking its fight against modern slavery into primary and secondary schools, with lesson plans, assembly guides and a fun song, which it is encouraging schools to sing as part of a national competition. The project is based on the premise that the tools to tackle modern slavery already exists in local communities, and that the church – present in all those communities – has the primary responsibility to lead the efforts to tackle it.Read the full article here. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Church of England takes modern slavery fight into classrooms Anglican Communion Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

As COVID-19 alters plans, YASC volunteers lean on faith

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events COVID-19, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Young Adult Service Corps, By Keaton RossPosted Apr 27, 2020 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Health & Healthcare, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth & Young Adults Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA As COVID-19 alters plans, YASC volunteers lean on faith Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Members of the Young Adult Service Corps and Episcopal Volunteers in Mission at the 2019 mission orientation at Holy Cross Monastery. Photo: Courtesy of YASC[Episcopal News Service] Like many Young Adult Service Corps volunteers serving across the Anglican Communion, Emily Darling saw her plans change dramatically in a matter of hours.On March 18, she woke up to news that the K-12 school where she was teaching in the small village of Kilimatinde, Tanzania, would close for a month. While the nearest coronavirus case was more than 300 miles to the north in the city of Arusha, the country’s prime minister had decided to close schools nationwide as a precautionary measure.Emily DarlingStill, many students came to the school that day to sweep floors and disinfect surfaces. Darling said goodbye and retreated back to her cottage on school property after the students finished cleaning, expecting to welcome back her second graders by mid-April.“Then, about eight hours later, I had the phone conversation that it was the best decision for me to come home at that point,” the 29-year-old from Colorado Springs, Colorado, told Episcopal News Service. “So when the kids return, they’ll have no idea that I came back to the U.S.”Five days after the phone call with Elizabeth Boe, The Episcopal Church’s Mission Personnel Officer who oversees YASC, Darling was self-quarantining at her parents’ home in Colorado. While a potential return is still several months away, she said she remains hopeful that she will be able return to Tanzania at some point.The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the mission work of nine Young Adult Service Corps volunteers serving across the globe. Ranging in age from 21 to 30, these “YASCers” partner with The Episcopal Church and their local parishes to live abroad for one to two years and work alongside church and other partners to strengthen communities through education, increased access to health care, micro-enterprise and agricultural initiatives, and civil and human rights protection. Each YASC volunteer maintains a blog, which may be accessed through this link.Isolating at home and abroadWhile many corps members have returned to the United States, a few remain dispatched across the world, Boe said. Those who remain abroad are using technology to work remotely and stay connected to members of their adopted community.Boe said her office has closely followed advice from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization over the past three months. All YASC volunteers were given the option to shelter in place and the decision to stay or return to the United States were made on a case-by-case basis, Boe said.“We monitor news, whether it’s health related, political or natural disasters around the world,” Boe said. “We pay attention to that so we can check in with our people, make sure they are OK and safe and that they’re doing what they need to do to look after themselves and the people that they’re working with.”Emma WrightCorps member Emma Wright is sheltering in place in Muscat, Oman, where she has served since last August. The 24-year-old is a member of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Arlington, Virginia. After graduating from Duke University with a degree in cultural anthropology, Wright worked at a small physical therapy office and planned to pursue a doctorate in physical therapy. She put those plans on hold after discovering the YASC program, saying she wanted to experience a different culture that offered new challenges and opportunities.Wright said the Middle East nation’s strong health care system and early response to slow the spread of COVID-19 made it an easy decision to stay.“They closed down when we still only had 30 cases in the country,” Wright said. “So right now, everything except businesses are closed — parks, beaches, trails. You aren’t allowed to walk around outside just for fun.”Wright works with the Al Amana Centre, an interfaith organization that aims to foster peace and reconciliation between Christians and Muslims. Video conferencing technology has allowed conversations about faith to continue, she said.“We’ve started Facebook Live interfaith dialogues,” Wright said. “So once a week — we’re calling it ‘fireside chat’ — we go on Facebook Live for an hour-long conversation between one of our team members and one of our local friends and talk about Islam, Christianity or Oman. We also answer questions from the audience.”Corps volunteer Nelson Pike, 23, who is living in Liverpool, England, also decided to remain abroad. A member of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in his hometown of Rockport, Massachusetts, Pike immediately entered the YASC program after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in history from St. Olaf College, a private Lutheran college in Minnesota. He said he was looking for a gap year program that offered a missional experience, and YASC was a perfect fit.Nelson PikePike said he made the decision to stay after weighing the risks associated with air travel.“I think we could all imagine airports are a center where you’re very much at risk for catching the virus,” he said. “So it’s just safer, me staying put and staying inside my house for as long as possible. That’s a decision that can be assessed again, but for right now, I’m happy here.”Pike has continued working with the Tsedaqah House, a missional community based at Liverpool Cathedral that carries out community-based social justice projects. In isolation, Pike has helped maintain a blog, prayerforliverpool.org, and is preparing food boxes for distribution to hungry community members.“I feel really lucky to be here and have a way to serve Christ, even under these conditions,” Pike said.For other YASCers, it became increasingly difficult to serve as the coronavirus spread.Mitchel BiebelheimerMitchel Biebelheimer arrived in the Philippines in September 2018 to work with the Episcopal Community Action for Renewal and Empowerment, or E-CARE, Foundation. The foundation aims to increase economic sustainability and encourage self-reliance in poor communities.Biebelheimer graduated from Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Oklahoma, with a bachelor’s degree in economics and international business. A parishioner of St. James’ Episcopal Church in Wagoner, Oklahoma, he applied to the Young Adult Service Corps because he wanted to volunteer before entering into a full-time career.Based in the rural community of Bontoc, about 12 hours north of the capital of Manila, Biebelheimer traveled to nearby communities and taught financial management and livelihood training courses to farmers and business owners. That work ended as fears of the coronavirus spread in early March.“I was looking at staying in the Philippines and not doing the work I found really satisfying,” he said. “I would just be waiting out quarantine. I thought that was a really hard thing to do, especially away from my family.”As Biebelheimer tried to book a flight home, the Philippine government was preparing to enter into total lockdown. On March 1, President Rodrigo Duterte ordered a nationwide lockdown that heavily restricted land movement across the country.Biebelheimer said he packed his bags as quickly as possible and went to the Department of Health, where he had his temperature checked and was given clearance to travel across the country by land. The journey to the airport in Manila would be a difficult one, however, as all public transportation in the Philippines was halted.Traveling with fellow YASC volunteer Talley Breedlove, the two were forced to improvise as they made the 12-hour drive south to the airport.“We decided I would drive the E-Care truck to Baguio, which is a six-hour drive, and we would switch to another E-Care truck that’s used less,” he said. “Then we would drive the six hours from Baguio to Manila.”Biebelheimer said he has remained in contact with friends in the Philippines, where the government lockdown remains in place until April 30. The nation has come under fire for how it is enforcing the lockdown, which requires citizens to stay inside their homes at all times. On April 2, Duterte told police they had the authority to “shoot down” any person disobeying the orders. Three days later, a Filipino man was shot and killed by police after threatening officers with a gardening tool.“Exactly what we thought would happen is happening — they’re in complete quarantine and they have military roaming the streets,” Biebelheimer said. “They’re not allowed to leave their house, you have to get special permission to go buy food. It’s a very unsocial situation there.”Leaning on faithAs YASC volunteers adjust to life back at home, or become accustomed to isolation while abroad, they say their faith has remained a steadying force during uncertain times.Pike said he has used his extra time in isolation to pray and tune in to online services.“I’m still being open to what God has to say to us, even in these conditions,” Pike said. “I think it is crucial to helping us maintain a healthy spiritual kind of modus operandi.”Wright said keeping a schedule not only has allowed her to remain on task and organized, but also has freed up time to spend with God.“I draw a lot of comfort from the idea of God as steady and unchanging,” Wright said. “When things got shut down and I knew I was going to be at the center by myself for an indefinite period of time, I actually made a schedule for myself, and one of the things on my schedule is called ‘appointment with God.’ I think that’s had a huge hand in keeping me grounded. It looks different every day, but usually it’s some combination of journaling, praying and meditating.”Now back in the United States several months earlier than she anticipated, Darling said faith has given her hope in a difficult season of life.“It may not be my plan, and it may not be what I want, but God is with me through all of it,” she said. “I actually have a ring that says, ‘If God will bring you through it, He will see you through it.’ And I thoroughly believe that.”– Keaton Ross is a senior journalism major at Oklahoma Christian University in Edmond, Oklahoma. Last summer, he worked as an intern at The Oklahoman newspaper in Oklahoma City. He loves iced coffee, and his favorite sports team is the Oklahoma City Thunder. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

Episcopal, ELCA leaders headline webinar connecting political advocacy with love…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By David PaulsenPosted Jul 9, 2020 Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Public Policy Network, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious, Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TNcenter_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Rector Tampa, FL Some forms of engagement are simple yet fundamental. Webinar participants were encouraged to complete this year’s U.S. census, if they hadn’t already, given the central role of census data in setting the contours of the American political landscape, from government funding to representation. The two churches also support efforts to get more people to vote, though Amy Reumann, the ELCA’s director of advocacy, emphasized that advocacy by churches must remain nonpartisan, especially in this election year.Even so, Eaton said Episcopalians and Lutherans need not shy away from speaking out in the name of their faith beliefs. The First Amendment “keeps the government out of the church but in no way precludes the church from showing up in the public sphere,” she said. “The spiritual and the temporal are both established by God.”Webinar participants were invited to submit questions, some of which were fielded by the panel. Reumann said several questions focused on how the churches and church members can support efforts to dismantle systems of racism that are still found in American institutions and society. The issue rose to the forefront of public debate this year after the killing of George Floyd and other Black victims of police brutality.The ELCA has been working to fight against racism in society, Eaton said, but “we still have a lot of progress to make.” Curry said much of The Episcopal Church’s racial reconciliation work so far has focused its efforts on the church’s own historic complicity in racism and racist systems, most notably through the Becoming Beloved Community framework. Some Episcopal institutions and leaders have begun taking up the broader call of systemic social change, he said, and anti-racism resolutions dominated last month’s meeting of Executive Council.Racial reconciliation also is a core component of the Office of Government Relations’ work in Washington, and the agency recently helped assemble resources for responding to racist violence. During the webinar, panelists further encouraged church members to join advocacy at the federal, state and local levels in favor of policies that will move communities and the country closer to racial and economic equity.Reumann compared such work to farming redwoods: It takes time, but eventually the result is magnificent. Curry made a similar point toward the end of the webinar.“What often looks like quick and rapid social change is the result of long, hard work that’s gone on for years,” he said, mentioning that his grandfather had joined marches on Washington back in the 1940s. “Social change does not happen overnight. It is the long, hard work of one generation working and another picking it up, and you keep working and you keep working and progress is made.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal, ELCA leaders headline webinar connecting political advocacy with love of neighbor More than 2,000 join session offering tips for public engagement Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska The webinar “Advocacy Tools for Loving Your Neighbor” was hosted July 9 by The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations and its counterpart in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. It was livestreamed on Zoom and Facebook.[Episcopal News Service] An Episcopal and Lutheran webinar on July 9, joined by more than 2,000 participants, highlighted the two churches’ nonpartisan political advocacy and offered tips for church members seeking to express their faith values through public engagement.The Episcopal Church’s Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, or ELCA, both participated in the webinar. Each spoke for about five minutes at the beginning, affirming that Christianity doesn’t just have something to say about contemporary society: It also calls on Christians to be advocates for justice.“It’s probably not accidental that Jesus speaks of the spirit of God as the advocate,” Curry said, citing the Gospel of John. “The work of advocacy really is the work of love, and it is the practical work of love in the social and public context.”The 90-minute webinar, titled “Advocacy Tools for Loving Your Neighbor,” was livestreamed on Zoom and Facebook and hosted by The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations and its ELCA counterpart. The two churches share resources for some of their advocacy work – an international policy adviser is employed by both denominations, for example – and Curry and Eaton often speak together on social justice issues.“Advocacy is a deeply spiritual discipline,” Eaton said, adding that the Lutheran tradition of advocacy dates to Martin Luther and is grounded in the biblical call to love one’s neighbor. In Luther’s teachings, “each person lives only for others, not for himself or herself,” she said.The Office of Government Relations bases its advocacy in Washington on resolutions passed by General Convention. The office’s staff members monitor legislation, coordinate with partner agencies and denominations and develop relationships with lawmakers to convey the church’s values-based stances on issues.The office also encourages Episcopalians’ activism through its Episcopal Public Policy Network, or EPPN. Rebecca Blachly, direct of the Office of Government Relations, began her presentation during the webinar by encouraging participants to sign up for weekly EPPN action alerts or the similar alerts distributed by the ELCA’s advocacy office.“Sign up for both. Get double the advocacy in your week,” Blachly said. The alerts provide information on a range of issues being debated in Congress, from immigration policy to federal food assistance, and they include ways to connect directly with lawmakers.Blachly also invited webinar participants to learn more about those issues, including through the resources developed and curated by her office and the ELCA. Some states have local advocacy networks to join, and it helps to seek out and partner with other community organizations that already are making progress on issues of interest, she said.She and other webinar presenters also encouraged participants to simply call, write a letter to or send an email to lawmakers’ offices, making the case to them for legislative action while drawing on personal values and real-life stories.Reaching out to elected officials helps hold them accountable, but it also offers them the expertise of their constituents, said Alan Yarborough, church relations officer in the Office of Government Relations. He also spoke of the importance of following the principles of civil discourse – advocating while also listening.“We can hold fast to our values while also learning from others and seeking to understand where they’re coming from,” Yarborough said. Civil discourse isn’t about being calm and polite, he said. It helps “navigate differences” and break down barriers to change, “to hear one another, rather than shout at each other from a distance.” Yarborough helped develop the church’s civil discourse curriculum, “Make Me an Instrument of Peace.” Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Faith & Politics, last_img read more

Diocese of South Carolina files motion in circuit court

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Property, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted Jul 1, 2020 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA South Carolina In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] On Monday, June 29, attorneys for the (Episcopal) Diocese of South Carolina and The Episcopal Church filed a Motion for Reconsideration and to Alter or Amend in the Court of Common Pleas for the First Judicial Circuit. This legal action is in response to the recent Order issued by South Carolina Circuit Court Judge Edgar Dickson that seemed to overturn the South Carolina Supreme Court final judgement from August 2017 which ruled that the diocesan property and 29 parishes should be returned to the parties affiliated with The Episcopal Church. This Supreme Court judgement in 2017 marked a reversal of the lower court decision.The motion requests that the Court “should reconsider the Order and alter or amend it to conform to the Supreme Court’s holding that the property of the twenty-nine churches is held in trust for Defendants and that the Defendant diocese is the beneficiary of the trust that owns legal title to the Diocesan Property.” The motion also asks “the Court to discharge its job of enforcing the final judgment of the South Carolina Supreme Court.”Throughout the 20-page document, attorneys for the Diocese and The Episcopal Church offer the following six reasons to reconsider the Order as they were outlined on page 3 (each were explained and supported in full in the text of the motion):This Court lacked the authority to issue the Order.Even if this Court had the authority to construe the Supreme Court’s decision, the Order misinterprets and contradicts that decision.Even if this Court somehow had the authority to relitigate the issues upon which the Supreme Court previously ruled, the Order incorrectly analyzes the facts and improperly applies the law.The Order incorrectly finds Plaintiffs were denied due process.Because of its rulings, the Court erred in denying Defendants’ requested relief.The Order fails to rule on all issues raised by DefendantsAs noted on page 18 of the motion: “After eight years of the adversarial process, for the Circuit Court to take away legally recognized rights at this time – based on the identical record that led to the Supreme Court’s reversal of Judge Goodstein – is nothing short of arbitrary and capricious.”Judge Edgar Dickson, a circuit court judge representing the First Judicial Circuit of South Carolina, was assigned this case in November 2017 when the South Carolina Supreme Court (SCSC) denied a Petition for Rehearing filed by the disassociated diocese. At that time, the SCSC issued a remittitur for the lower court to enforce the final judgement as decided by a 3-2 majority of the Court, which reversed the decision of the trial court.About The Diocese of South CarolinaThe historic Diocese of South Carolina (DSC) also known as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina (TECSC) is the local diocese in the eastern half of South Carolina part of The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion. For more information, view A Historical Timeline of the Diocese of South Carolina and the Frequently Asked Questions. For the latest on DSC, visit episcopalchurchsc.org or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Diocese of South Carolina files motion in circuit court Motion questions judge’s authority to side with previous lower court ruling already reversed by the state’s Supreme Court AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

Public Participation Gets an Upgrade in Apopka

first_img David Rankin Reply July 10, 2016 at 5:20 pm Reply July 9, 2016 at 10:49 am Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSApopka City Council Previous articleCity Center contract near to close, but will Highland Manor survive?Next articleCorrine Brown Indicted – Pleads Not Guilty Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 3 COMMENTS Apopka’s City Council meetings have always provided an opportunity for citizens to speak their mind on any topic.Unfortunately to exercise your First Amendment right, “… to petition the Government for a redress of grievances,” you had to wait until nearly the end of the meeting.  This often meant waiting for several hours while the Council moved deliberately through its agenda.Wednesday’s Council meeting was typical. Members of the public had to wait 2 hours and 20 minutes before being allowed to step to the podium for their allotted four minutes.The first 17 minutes were used to deal with several “routine” items that involved little, if any, discussion:Approval of Minutes from previous meetingsTwo Proclamations:Eight Employee RecognitionThe introduction of four newly sworn in Police OfficersFive Consent Agenda itemsThe first agenda item with discussion and public input was the approval of new Recreation Youth Sports League fees (35 minutes).Six proposed Ordinances and one Resolution were then discussed and voted on next (27 minutes).Two Final Development Plans were then reviewed and approved (20 minutes)A 35 minute presentation on how to improve the Development Review process came next, followed by a well-needed 5 minute break.After the break the City’s CPA firm, Moore Stephens Lovelace, made a 24 minute presentation of the City’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.The approved Public Participation Resolution moves the public comment period to immediately after the Presentations portion of the meeting.  Had the new policy been in place last Wednesday the public comments would have happened 2 hours earlier.The “upgrade” only applies to comments being made about topics not on the meeting agenda.  Those wishing to address items on the agenda will have to wait until that item is brought before the City Council. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Ms. Reid, you are absolutely correct to commend Commissioner Becker, Bankson & Dean, they really stepped up to support the rights of City of Apopka voters. Commissioner Velazquez and Mayor Kilsheimer do not support the City of Apopka residents, they are more interested in status and power. Velazquez gives the appearance as though she was elected to office my Kilsheimer himself. We need a change and soon!!! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Tenita Reid Please enter your comment! July 12, 2016 at 9:17 am Regardless of the issue and as sure as the sun rises in the east, Diane Velazquez will always cast a vote that is in lockstep with Joe Kilsheimer. In her 2+ year tenure on the Apopka City Commission, I can’t recall a single instance where she wasn’t aligned with him. In fact, there have been multiple occasions where she appeared confused and didn’t seem to understand the complexities of the issue at hand. In those situations, Joe often steps in to bail her out by telling everyone, but mostly Diane, how he will be voting. If it wasn’t so serious it would be comical. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Sue Grandy Please enter your name here I want to thank each individual Apopka City Commissioner who supported the public’s rights, regarding the public participation ordinance, and who listened to the members of the public, about their concerns and that they believed their public comment discussion period at the council meetings, were being limited, and to the commissioners who listened, and therefore pushed for the ordinance to be amended, as had been written, and had called for a new rewritten ordinance to be presented for approval. Therefore, I want to personally thank Apopka City Commissioner Kyle Becker, Apopka City Commissioner Doug Bankson, and Apopka City Commissioner Billie Dean. Government for the people and by the people! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

What Delta Airlines passengers need to know for Wednesday

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here TAGStravel Previous articleSheriff: Be on the lookout for bank robbery suspectNext articleBankson wins an election and joins a team Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here According to Delta Airlines officials, the airline anticipates returning to normal operations by mid-to-late afternoon Wednesday following a power outage Monday that disrupted the airline’s flight schedule. A chance of scattered thunderstorms expected in the eastern U.S. may have the potential slow the recovery.Delta Airlines is advising passengers of the following:Delta will start the Wednesday operation with a little over 150 system-wide cancellations after roughly 800 flights were canceled Tuesday. Teams across the airline continued work during the overnight hours to bring an end to the impact of Monday’s outage that disrupted operations.Technology systems that allow airport customer service agents to process check-ins, conduct boarding and dispatch aircraft are functioning normally with the bulk of delays and cancellations coming as a result of flight crews displaced or running up against their maximum allowed duty period following the outage.Customers traveling today should plan to allow extra time at the airport and check the status of their flight at delta.com or the Fly Delta App. Customers can rebook their flight via the website.Delta’s travel waiver has been extended to August 10 and the airline has continued to provide hotel vouchers to several thousand customers, including more than 2,300 Tuesday night in Atlanta.Delta will extend its offer of compensation to customers significantly affected by delays or cancellations. Many customers have already been contacted by Delta agents.Unaccompanied minors will again be allowed to travel on Delta Wednesday following a temporary stay during the height of the disruption. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom last_img read more

Apopka Weekly Arrest Report

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSAPDApopka Police DepartmentArrest Report Previous article10 ways to stay on your holiday diet at StarbucksNext articleMiss Apopka Judges Announced Claire Haslett RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Apopka Police Department Arrest Report ~ November 15 – November 21The Apopka Police Department reported the following statistics for the week ending November 21:Calls For Service     1353Traffic Citations           48Crash Reports             84In addition, the Apopka Police Department reported  19 arrests for the week ending November 21st.  Four  juveniles were arrested. One arrest was the result of a vehicle burglary reported on E. 8th St., also listed on the Burglary Report.Arrested and charged were 11 adults from Apopka, 3 adults from Orlando, 1 adult from Longwood, 2 juveniles from Apopka, 1 juvenile from Ocoee and 1 juvenile from an unknown residence.All of the arrests are listed here:GIBSON, KYLE WILLIAM (19) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionHARRIS, JOHN MICHAEL (37) of APOPKA – BatteryHOPPER, JAMES LEE (51) of APOPKA –  TrespassingWOODLEY, DEVONTE DEVELLE (22) of APOPKA –  BurglaryWARREN, SHANDRICKA SHARMANE (24) of ORLANDO –  Possession of Counterfeit PrescriptionHEWITT, JOHN L. (43) of APOPKA – Family Offense – Civil Writ of AttachTRULOCK, CHARLES ROMA (76) of ORLANDO – DUIBALDWIN, NARKEITH JAIREE (23) of APOPKA – Probation ViolationBOYER, ROBERT DWAYNE (42) of APOPKA –  Multiple charges including Making False Report to PoliceGONZALEZ, KRYSTINA (26) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including DUI & Driving while License SuspendedRIVERA, IVAN (21) of APOPKA Hit and RunALMON, MICHELLE ANN (44) of APOPKA  – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionFICHERA, ANGELA RENE (32) of LONGWOOD –  Out of County WarrantSUMMERS, GARY PAUL (53) of APOPKA – DUIPATTERSON, SHAWN L (45) of APOPKA – Vehicle BurglaryJUVENILE (12) of APOPKA – BatteryJUVENILE (17) of UNKNOWN –  Multiple charges including Drug PossessionJUVENILE (17) of APOPKA  – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionJUVENILE (15) of OCOEE – Resisting an OfficerArrest report details provided by the Apopka Police Department Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name herelast_img read more