Saint Mary’s students celebrate College’s tradition with tea

first_imgTuesday afternoon’s teatime at the Riedinger House offered Saint Mary’s College students an opportunity to see some of the school’s traditions brought to life. Director of Alumnae Relations Kara O’Leary said graduates of the school are crucial in keeping the College’s traditions alive. “The Alumnae Association works to keep alumnae connected to each other as well as the College,” she said. “It represents decades [of alumnae] and geographical locations of the alumnae population at large.” Tea in Riedinger House during Heritage Week began three years ago and has grown in popularity each year, O’Leary said. Along with the Student Government Association (SGA), she has had to schedule additional times for students to attend. There will be two more sessions held on Wednesday at 4 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. O’Leary said the strength of the school’s alumnae is considerable, noting Saint Mary’s College possesses the top women’s Catholic alumnae association in the nation. “Students realize their time here [at Saint Mary’s] is short, but they will be alumnae the rest of their lives,” O’Leary said. SGA chief of staff Emily Skirtich said the events of the week serve to evoke the history of the school. “The goal of Heritage Week is to remind veteran students and tell current students about the College and the rich traditions we celebrate here,” she said. Skitich said SGA chose Riedinger House because of the building’s rich historical tradition on campus. “It reminds students of what life here used to be like versus what it is now,” she said. “We are celebrating one of the storied places on campus.” Adaline Crowley Riedinger, Class of 1864, was responsible for donating the majority of the funds to construct the house. Riedinger was also the first alumna to send her daughter, Mary Adalaide Riedinger, Class of 1889, to Saint Mary’s College. O’Leary said the rich tradition of the house serves as a reminder of what it means to be an alumna of the College. “We open Riedinger House because it is the first mother-daughter legacy connection at Saint Mary’s,” O’Leary said. “One of best parts of the tea is educating our students on what being post-Saint Mary’s means.” Junior Madeline Meckes said she was initially unaware of the historical significance of the building, but appreciated the opportunity to learn more about the traditions of the College. “I learned a lot about the history of the house and the alumnae association. I thought it was really cool that it used to be used as a practice house for home economics majors,” Meckes said. Skirtich said students’ thirst to understand more about their school means Heritage Week gets stronger each year. “Each year SGA (Student Government Association) strives to highlight all the really important parts of the College and its history,” she said. “Each year keeps getting better and better. The students appreciate where we came from and all the College has to offer.”last_img read more

CHOW warehouse distributes milk to community

first_imgAs a food bank CHOW says they are one of the beneficiaries of being able to buy milk for donations. The milk came from Broome-Tioga BOCES donations as well as a diary farm from Delhi. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The CHOW Warehouse distributed thousands of gallons of milk on Friday from its facility in Binghamton. Over the past couple of weeks the warehouse acquired thousands of gallons of milk for this distribution event. Helping dairy farmers get their product out, and getting it to the people who need it within the community.center_img On Thursday the warehouse did its first run of the distribution, Friday was the second day to make sure the community had a chance to get what they needed. “We know that milk is a staple in our diet and we know with what has been going on with COVID-19 a lot of farmers have lost sales with the closures of schools, dining halls, etc. and they’ve had to dump a lot of milk” said Les Aylesworth the Director of CHOW. Aylesworth continues, “With recent funding and recent movement theres been the ability to donate milk and be able to purchase milk for donations.”last_img read more

US study says assisted suicide laws rife with dangers to people with disabilities

first_imgBioEdge 13 October 2019Family First Comment: The National Council on Disability (NCD) has released a scathing analysis of the effect of assisted suicide laws in the United States on people with disabilities. It finds that safeguards are ineffective and that there is little oversight of abuses and mistakes…. The most prevalent reasons offered by someone requesting assisted suicide are directly related to unmet service and support needs. These should be dealt with through new laws and more funding, says NCD, not assisted suicide. “Assisted suicide laws are premised on the notion of additional choice for people at the end of their lives, however in practice, they often remove choices when the low-cost option is ending one’s life versus providing treatments to lengthen it or services and supports to improve it.” The National Council on Disability (NCD) has released a scathing analysis of the effect of assisted suicide laws in the United States on people with disabilities. It finds that safeguards are ineffective and that there is little oversight of abuses and mistakes.In eight states and the District of Columbia it is legal for doctors to prescribe lethal drugs to patients diagnosed with terminal illness and with a prognosis of six months or less to live, if certain procedural steps are followed.Pain relief is often described as the primary motivation for seeking assisted suicide. In its report, Assisted Suicide Laws and their Danger to People with Disabilities, NCD responds that the most prevalent reasons offered by someone requesting assisted suicide are directly related to unmet service and support needs. These should be dealt with through new laws and more funding, says NCD, not assisted suicide.“Assisted suicide laws are premised on the notion of additional choice for people at the end of their lives, however in practice, they often remove choices when the low-cost option is ending one’s life versus providing treatments to lengthen it or services and supports to improve it,” said NCD Chairman Neil Romano.Closely examining the experience in Oregon, where the practice has been legal for 20 years, NCD found that the list of conditions eligible for assisted suicide has expanded considerably over time, including many disabilities that, when properly treated, do not result in death, including arthritis, diabetes, and kidney failure.Assisted Suicide Laws and their Danger to People with Disabilities also notes suicide contagion in states where assisted suicide is legal; as well as a loosening of existing safeguards both in states with legalized assisted suicide and states considering bills to legalize.READ MORE: https://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/us-study-saysassisted-suicide-laws-rife-with-dangers-to-people-with-disabil/13245last_img read more

Sunday blog: Talking Kansas constitution, marijuana shops, Bieber and Harding

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Five Cueball thoughts for January 19, 2014… Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (4) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +3 Vote up Vote down Harold Gaines · 342 weeks ago A quick check of the Kansas Constitution verifies that the Legislature can’t just change the Constitution willy-nilly. Two-thirds of each house have to approve the amendment and then it has to be submitted to voters. It only becomes part of the Constitution if a majority of voters vote to adopt it. I don’t think there’s much to worry about. Report Reply 0 replies · active 342 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Jim · 342 weeks ago The other side of this school legislative story is that local school boards have lost control to federal laws that keep them from being fiscally responsible. If local school boards would be able to control the transportation (none), feeding (by mom), and hiring and paying of teachers within a budget they had 100% control of, instead of only rubber stamp control. We might not have to worry about the legislature or the federal court system running the schools. Report Reply 0 replies · active 342 weeks ago -3 Vote up Vote down Not a Fan · 342 weeks ago I don’t think Kerrigan was much above being trash either. She married her coach who was much older. Her brother murdered on of their parents. Yep it sure sounds like Kerrigan was from an upstanding family. Harding and Kerrigan were equal in their moral standings. But the two did make Womens figure skating in America a billion dollar business. On the school finance issue. Why is it that property owners should pay the bulk of the cost of educating peoples kids? Education is a States only issue, the federal government has no place in it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 342 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 342 weeks ago Finding ways to make cuts in a budget isn’t easy. It can be done though. Report Reply 0 replies · active 342 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments 1. A constitutional crisis in Kansas?…A Sumner Newscow reader sent me this link of an editorial piece in the New York Times: “What’s the Matter with Kansas Schools?” See article here.The article outlines the Republican-led Legislature’s cuts in school spending that now sits before the state Supreme Court. “The outcome of that decision could resonate nationwide. Forty-five states have had lawsuits challenging the failure of governors and legislators to provide essential resources for a constitutional education.” The article goes on to point out that the Kansas Legislature slashed public funding to 16.5 percent below the 2008 level. Class sizes have increased, teachers and staff members have been laid off and services to at-risk students were eliminated.David Sciarra and Wade Henderson of the New York Times wrote that their biggest fear is if the Kansas Supreme Court orders restoration of the funding, Kansas legislators are threatening to amend the state’s Constitution by removing the requirement for “suitable” school fund and to strip Kansas courts of jurisdiction to hear school finance cases altogether.The outcome could strip the judiciary of any authority and allow the legislature to run amok with no checks and balances.This is some scary stuff. I urge you to read the full article. It’s one thing to make spending cuts and our governmental entities more fiscally accountable. It’s a whole different story to rewrite the state constitution to suit your wants and needs. Then it becomes dictatorial government. 2. No pugnacious odor …Last week, I expressed opposition for legalizing marijuana. But that doesn’t mean I’m not fascinated by the whole implementation of the law in Colorado.Colorado marijuana shop owners are making a mint — that is if they can get one open. Part of the problem is getting your neighbors to cooperate.The Denver City Council has been deluged with zoning complaints. So much so a new policy has been created. A neighboring business owner can’t just protest because he/she doesn’t like the new law, but has to demonstrate how this new Mary Jane distribution center is hurting his/her business.For instance, the smell. If you can whiff weed at an adjacent business, then you can legitimately derail the chances of a marijuana shop opening nearby. Colorado state and city officials are pretty specific that a marijuana shop owner needs proper ventilation and complete odor containment within the confines of his/her business, or there won’t be a business to sell the wacky tobacky.I like that policy. I wonder if the same rules can apply to feedlots in Kansas? 4. Tonya Harding…Tonya HardingAnd then there is Tonya Harding. You remember her. She was the white trash figure skater who allegedly planned the knee whacking of fellow skater Nancy Kerrigan in an attempt to win the 1994 Winter Olympic gold medal.ESPN did a retrospective 30 for 30 documentary on the torrid story — still one of my favorite sports scandals of all time.Today, Harding is a lot bigger, and as nasty as ever. I was stunned with her candor in the 30 for 30 interview. That’s a vindictive woman who will go to her grave with two fists clenched screaming how she hates Nancy Kerrigan.Harding didn’t seem to have any friends throughout the fiasco in the early 1990s. Where were the people who were supposed to protect her? Heck she didn’t even have security and had to workout in a mall skating rink when the scandal was at its peak.Come to think of it, Harding and Bieber are the same people — two misbegotten souls without legitimate friends to protect them from themselves. Could Justin be the illegitimate son of Tonya? They do kind of look alike. Hmmm….. 5. Shout out of the week… This week’s shout out goes to Karla Defore’s Wellington High School Leadership classes for organizing a Leadership Summit at the high school this Tuesday which will have more than 1,000 Sumner County students attending. See story here.There’s little doubt, Wellington has some great kids going through the system right now. I can’t wait for them to become future community leaders – no matter where they choose to live. 3. Justin Bieber…Another topic that fascinates me is Justin Bieber. Not that I find the punk a particularly talented performer or someone I’d want to spend two seconds with.Justin BieberI’m just intrigued how self destructing this neanderthal has become. You can’t go a week without hearing a story about something stupid he has done.His latest exploits last week was he and his entourage were throwing eggs at the neighbor’s house. What are they: 12? It earned him a trip to the police station and a search of his mansion. While there, the police found cocaine in the room of his no-talent rapper buddy – who is obviously sponging off of Bieber.Bieber is doing a good job ruining his life and I’m OK with that. But I have to question, where the heck are his handlers — you know people like his parents, his agent, his money manager, the guy in charge of babysitting him?Do any of these people realize, Bieber is their meal ticket? If Bieber is throwing away his career, he’s throwing their career away along with it.Bieber is obviously an idiot. But it’s also obvious the people he surrounds himself with aren’t any smarter.last_img read more