2 parties, 2 messages on harassment

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post.Rep. John Conyers Jr., D-Mich., finally — and thankfully — recognized he really had no choice but to resign as Congress’ longest-serving member in the face of mounting accusations from multiple women that he had sexually harassed them.His is the first departure as Congress confronts issues of sexual harassment.Surely it won’t be the last — not if Congress is serious about putting an end to workplace abuse and sexual misbehavior. Conyers, 88, on Tuesday announced from a Detroit hospital where was being treated for a stress-related illness that he was immediately giving up the seat he has held for 52 years.It was sad to see the storied career of the longest-serving African-American in congressional history and an icon of liberal policymaking end so gracelessly.Having tried to delay the inevitable, he was defiant in his refusal to acknowledge any wrongdoing and selfish in seeking to anoint his son as his successor. Voters, not legacy, will decide who represents the Detroit-area district. Meanwhile, Conyers’ departure hopefully will serve as an example with lessons to be learned.Foremost to women who have been victims of sexual harassment and who saw themselves until recently as powerless to fight back and get justice.The women who stepped forward with credible claims of mistreatment were heard and believed, and there was an appropriate reckoning. Some credit for that goes to the Democratic Party, which worked to force Conyers out of office after determining the allegations had merit.Seemingly first working behind the scenes and then publicly calling on him to resign, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., made clear after some initial hesitation that the party will not tolerate sexual harassment.It’s a message that has been reinforced with Pelosi’s demand that another Democrat, Rep. Ruben Kihuen, Nev., accused of propositioning his campaign finance director, resign, and with Democratic party leaders welcoming a Senate ethics committee inquiry into allegations that Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., groped women at public events. Republicans, sad to say, are sending a very different message.It was recently revealed that Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, used $84,000 in taxpayer money to settle a sexual harassment claim against him from his former spokeswoman.The woman, as detailed by Politico, saw her life upended.But there has been no call for Farenthold’s resignation from House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., even though he was quick to want Conyers gone in the wake of similar allegations.Does Farenthold’s offer to pay back the $84,000 really set things right? Where’s the outrage?We gather it’s in the same place Republicans parked their principles when they decided that helping elect an accused child sex predator to the Senate — or giving a pass to a president who boasted about assaulting women — was OK because it served their political purposes. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Take tax exemption away from churches

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Jan. 2 letter, “Let churches have freedom of speech”: Wallace Hughes recently pointed out that a church may lose its tax-exempt status if it engages in politically colored speech and held that this amounts to denial of the church’s freedom of speech. It appears to me that a church, as a non-profit, is entitled to First Amendment rights under the legal fiction of personhood, making the question one of tax vulnerability, not freedom of speech. One approach would be to remove the general tax-exempt status for churches, perhaps exempting substantive temporal aid to the public service. This approach might be more nearly fair for all taxpayers and would not require analysis of church speech.John HersheyCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsPolice: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Guest Column: Preserve city’s history at Liberty Park

first_imgOur local government could capitalize on this rich past by reaffirming liberty in the park’s name, reinstalling the Statue of Liberty replica, and educating students and visitors about Schenectady’s historical support for liberty.The European-American men of Schenectady felt free enough from the encumbrances of monarchial rule in 1766, or perhaps were supportive of it, that they felt no need to form a Schenectady chapter of the Sons of Liberty when requested to do so by the Albany branch.However, by 1775, war had broken out between the Americans and the British, and the people of Schenectady formed a Committee of Safety to defend American interests.The committee elected Christopher Yates chairman, who one year earlier was a founder and the first master of Schenectady’s first Masonic lodge, which was named in honor of St. George.While the first organizational meeting of the Committee of Safety was held at William White’s house, it is possible that future meetings were held in the same location as meetings of St. George’s Lodge.They met at one of the most important meeting places of the time, the Tavern of the Crossed Keys.Robert Clench ran the tavern. Until the city removed it recently, there was a state Department of Education historical marker in Liberty Park designating its location and marking the visit of a certain general. Categories: Editorial, Opinion A record of that meeting does not exist, but Washington wrote a note of thanks to his hosts before he left Schenectady.This note alludes to the discussions about liberty he had with town residents.“In a cause so just and righteous as ours,” he wrote, “May you and the good people of this town … be protected from every insidious or open foe and may the complete blessings of peace soon reward your arduous struggle for establishment of the freedom and independence of our common country.”The city of Schenectady now has a choice.Exile Lady Liberty from her park, eradicate all reference to George Washington’s visit to the location, and eliminate liberty from the park’s name, or continue to capitalize on Schenectady’s historical support and respect for the beautiful idea of liberty.Thomas Hodgkins is a former history teacher and one-time Schenectady resident.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists For The Sunday GazetteIn downtown Schenectady during the Revolutionary War era, Liberty Park was the location where people met to discuss, plan and organize for securing liberty for our people.In the 20th century, people used the site to reflect upon and celebrate the core principle of American life, liberty. The Committee of Safety became the governing committee of the town and helped organize multiple aspects of civic life, including the recruitment and provisioning of two companies of militia men to, in the words of the day, “preserve, if possible, the just liberties of America and to keep and defend the important port of Ticandaroga [sic] in conjunction with brethren of New England”.These were the first soldiers from Schenectady to fight for our country’s freedom, and they marched under company flags emblazoned with the motto “Liberty or Death.”The American Revolution raged on and slowly the British were battered back.On June 30, 1782, Gen. George Washington traveled to Schenectady to discuss the struggle for liberty.Word of his arrival reached the town before he did, so dozens of residents rode their horses out to greet him.When the procession entered the town, about 100 Oneidas and Tuscaroras in full battle array greeted him along with the town’s residents, ringing bells and firing cannons. It was a joyous day.Later that evening, an exclusive group hosted Washington at the Tavern of the Crossed Keys for dinner, toasts and discussions.last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Nov. 3

first_imgDyslexia screening is a welcome mandateThe Oct. 27 headline (“Local lawmakers support dyslexia screening mandate”) brings sudden tears to my eyes. My grandson suffered through his early school years, a victim of dyslexia.In spite of continued effort, he could not accomplish success as his classmates did. Consequently, he experienced daily failure and humiliation.This scenario is a very tough one. It’s an awesome burden for a youngster. Parents deal with similar feelings with their inability to help him at home.Teacher conferences were dismal meetings and time was passing without encouragement or answers.On July 28, 2003, Time magazine published an article on dyslexia.Seemingly, there was a wide disparity within the school’s curriculum to train staff to the possibilities of this problem. Teachers began requesting this training when they learned of my grandson’s disability.My daughter persevered with further research now that she had a direction. Ultimately, she presented her findings to the school board. She met with hard resistance, but eventually succeeded in securing classroom assistance for her son.Finally, the long arduous school days began to ebb, and a very bright youngster began to absorb his schoolwork. A completely competent student was finally able to show his prowess. Today, he is a successful young man, well in control and mastery of his dyslexia. My daughter has become the go-to person for many other parents.Godspeed this proposal. Our heartfelt thanks go to all those supporting its passage — a long overdue acknowledgment of this problem.Margaret M. NixonMechanicville‘Socialism’ still a fear tactic of RepublicansIn an October 10, 1952, campaign speech, delivered from the rear platform of a train in Syracuse, President Harry S. Truman said that “Socialism is a scareword (sic) that they have hurled at every advance the people have made in the last 20 years.“Socialism is what they called public power. Socialism is what they called social security. Socialism is what they called farm price supports.“Socialism is what they called bank deposit insurance. Socialism is what they called public power. Socialism is what they called the growth of free and independent labor organizations. Socialism is their name for almost anything that helps all the people.”“They” were the Republicans — and 67 years later — they’re still at it.Walter F. WoukSummitTrump killing dream for a better worldDuring my life, I have tried to follow a “do no harm” strategy.For mankind and my children’s sake, I hoped to leave this world in as good or better condition than it was when I was born.Now, in my 80th year, I sadly observe Trump’s destruction of my lifelong dream. Every action taken by the president reduces the possibility of attaining my goal.His environmental deregulations have increased the pollution of our air and water. His denial of global warming threatens the very existence of mankind.His border wall mentality fails to recognize the root causes of mass migration. His economic policies increase the gap between the rich and the poor.His military threats and isolationism jeopardize world peace. His tax revisions benefit the rich and increase the national debt in a time of economic prosperity.His chipping away of the ACA threatens many families with the financial disaster of a serious illness. His subservience to the NRA prevents the adoption of significant gun control legislation.His narcissistic, lying, immoral behavior has destroyed our respect for the office of the president.To restore my broken dream, Trump must either be impeached or defeated in the next election.Charles RiellyAltamontMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWe’ve had enough of Trump’s misconductThe clandestine relationship between Trump and Putin, I believe, started long before the 2016 presidential campaign.They could have planned it all in advance. Trump might have agreed to join the race if Putin assured his winning. The Russian hacking of Clinton’s emails, as well as those of the Democratic National Committee, gave the scheme its impetus.This arrangement could explain Trump’s love affair with Putin. As Nancy Pelosi said recently, “All roads lead to Russia.”In an attempt to ensure his winning in 2020, he has overstepped the boundaries enough to cause an impeachment inquiry. His bragging about his “unmatched wisdom” has only proven how dumb he really is.Calling his opponents “human scum” was a nasty thing to say, even for him. He, along with Pence, Pompeo, Barr, Mulvaney, Giuliani and Perry, are the real “human scum.”We absolutely do not need another four years of Donald Trump.Jane ReisengerSchenectadyHappy to see threats now taken seriouslyI read this newspaper daily due to being a person that visits this area frequently, and I read the Oct. 23 story “Saratoga Sheriff: 13-year-old charged in Schuylerville school threat.”When I glanced over this story, I thought of how the school system has changed since I was in high school not too long ago.These days, threats made by anyone have to be taken with an urgent response from the police department. It is very unfortunate that some adolescents make a threat like this without realizing the initial impact it has on others. I am thankful that the district officials were able to pass this along to the police to deal with I believe that things like this should be taken seriously, regardless if it is a joke or not.Kameron KellySharon Springslast_img read more

Billiton to be the first tenant at new Adelphi

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Five bid up the junction to revamp Clapham relic

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Big Brother: watching you, watching me

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

MAB calls on High Court to speed up hearing

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Expanding Ryden buys Aberdeen firm

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

If you thought speculative development in the City was a thing of the past…think again

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img