Saint Mary’s students celebrate College’s tradition with tea

first_imgTuesday afternoon’s teatime at the Riedinger House offered Saint Mary’s College students an opportunity to see some of the school’s traditions brought to life. Director of Alumnae Relations Kara O’Leary said graduates of the school are crucial in keeping the College’s traditions alive. “The Alumnae Association works to keep alumnae connected to each other as well as the College,” she said. “It represents decades [of alumnae] and geographical locations of the alumnae population at large.” Tea in Riedinger House during Heritage Week began three years ago and has grown in popularity each year, O’Leary said. Along with the Student Government Association (SGA), she has had to schedule additional times for students to attend. There will be two more sessions held on Wednesday at 4 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. O’Leary said the strength of the school’s alumnae is considerable, noting Saint Mary’s College possesses the top women’s Catholic alumnae association in the nation. “Students realize their time here [at Saint Mary’s] is short, but they will be alumnae the rest of their lives,” O’Leary said. SGA chief of staff Emily Skirtich said the events of the week serve to evoke the history of the school. “The goal of Heritage Week is to remind veteran students and tell current students about the College and the rich traditions we celebrate here,” she said. Skitich said SGA chose Riedinger House because of the building’s rich historical tradition on campus. “It reminds students of what life here used to be like versus what it is now,” she said. “We are celebrating one of the storied places on campus.” Adaline Crowley Riedinger, Class of 1864, was responsible for donating the majority of the funds to construct the house. Riedinger was also the first alumna to send her daughter, Mary Adalaide Riedinger, Class of 1889, to Saint Mary’s College. O’Leary said the rich tradition of the house serves as a reminder of what it means to be an alumna of the College. “We open Riedinger House because it is the first mother-daughter legacy connection at Saint Mary’s,” O’Leary said. “One of best parts of the tea is educating our students on what being post-Saint Mary’s means.” Junior Madeline Meckes said she was initially unaware of the historical significance of the building, but appreciated the opportunity to learn more about the traditions of the College. “I learned a lot about the history of the house and the alumnae association. I thought it was really cool that it used to be used as a practice house for home economics majors,” Meckes said. Skirtich said students’ thirst to understand more about their school means Heritage Week gets stronger each year. “Each year SGA (Student Government Association) strives to highlight all the really important parts of the College and its history,” she said. “Each year keeps getting better and better. The students appreciate where we came from and all the College has to offer.”last_img read more

Students design “Sweet” fundraiser

first_img “The people from APimage were so helpful and guided us through the design process, listening to our suggestions and making recommendations based off their expertise,” she said. “We love the way the shirt turned out, and hope everyone else does as well.” Students can visit Let’s Spoon on April 19 with vouchers downloaded from www.hannahandfriends.org/calendar. The group will also be selling the shirts for $10 at the Student Center today during lunch and dinner hours. Contact Jillian Barwick at jbarwi01@saintmarys.edu Saint Mary’s students can reward their sweet tooth while also supporting a good cause this Thursday, thanks to several seniors working on a class project. Chrissy Carson, Amanda Noesen, Michelle Rozman, Erika Scoliere and Kelly Smetana had no difficulty in choosing Hannah & Friends as their charitable cause for a marketing management class at Saint Mary’s. “Hannah & Friends is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for children and adults with special needs,” Rozman said. “We chose this foundation because they have impacted the South Bend community in such a positive way. Our group feels that Hannah & Friends’ mission is inspiring, and we wanted to help support the work they do.” After picking the charity, which was founded by former Irish football coach Charlie Weis and his wife Maura, the group decided what type of event to use as a fundraiser for the foundation. “We chose [frozen yogurt shop] Let’s Spoon as our event location because of its popularity among students and the community, and because it is a lot of fun,” Rozman said. “Customers can create their orders exactly as they want, so there is something for everyone. “We wanted to pick a location that would appeal to all ages and with the weather getting warmer, we thought Let’s Spoon would be perfect for our event.” The theme of the event is “Let’s Eat Something Sweet.” Rozman said this reflects the group idea behind the event of having a fun place for people to get together while supporting a great cause. After the group knew they wanted to collaborate with Hannah & Friends and Let’s Spoon, they shared their ideas with both organizations to discuss how to get the event up and running. “Our event requires a lot of planning,” Rozman said. “We have been working with both Hannah & Friends and Let’s Spoon for weeks leading up to the event.” The group worked with APimage to design a t-shirt for the event, Rozman said.last_img read more

Ticket reservations reopen for Ruth Bader Ginsburg talk

first_imgStudents will have a second chance Friday to apply for tickets to see U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speak during her first-ever visit to Notre Dame.The main event, “A Conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,” will be held in Purcell Pavilion on Monday from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and is free but ticketed.Due to a high number of sales after the event was initially announced Aug. 30, ticket reservations were temporarily suspended. Tickets sales reopened Friday morning for members of the student body and are available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on a first-come, first-serve basis.On the day of the event, doors open at 4:30 p.m. Monday, and students are encouraged to arrive by 5 p.m. to pass through security checkpoints. Attendees should enter through the south side of the Joyce Center.Photography, videography, weapons, backpacks, purses and large bags will be prohibited from the event, according to the email.Ginsburg has served on the U.S. Supreme Court since her appointment by President Bill Clinton on Aug. 10, 1993. Prior to assuming her seat on the Supreme Court, Ginsburg served as general counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) from 1973 to 1980 and subsequently served on the organization’s national board of directors from 1974 to 1980.Ann Williams, a U.S. Circuit Judge and 1975 law school alumna, will serve as moderator for the conversation. Williams was appointed to the Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 1999. She currently serves on the University’s Board of Trustees.The event is sponsored by the Office of the President, Notre Dame Law School and Notre Dame Student Government. Tickets are available online and more information can be found at nd.edu/Ginsburg.Tags: Notre Dame Law School, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Courtlast_img read more

Tri-campus community to close due to extreme cold

first_imgTags: Campus Safety, Snow Day, winter weather Anna Mason | The Observer Students brave the harsh conditions outside of the Science Hall Monday afternoon. The tri-campus community is shutting down beginning Tuesday evening due to the extremely cold weather.“We’re going to keep the student dining halls open for extended hours,” Brown said. “LaFortune and the library will be open for 24 hours but the vendors will not be there, so the only place for food will be the dining halls.”Browne said he worked closely with St. Joseph County regarding road closures and emergency measures.“I’m part of a small group that is working on these weather-related issues,” Browne said. “We’re having a meeting with county officials this afternoon. But at this point … we don’t anticipate road closure.”In the event of road closures, measures will be taken to ensure campus is still accessible, he said.“We would make arrangements with the county to have our power plant people be able to come to campus to operate the power plant and other essential personnel,” Browne said.According to an article published by the South Bend Tribune on Saturday, temperatures are projected to reach minus 12 Tuesday, hover around minus 6 during the day Wednesday and minus 15 the following night, then rise to minus 4 on Thursday.Wind chills Wednesday and Thursday may reach 30 below zero, the article said. Skin exposed for longer than 10 minutes may be at risk for frostbite.Browne said the Notre Dame community should take several precautions to stay safe in the extreme conditions.“Appreciate the fact that, in these kind of temperatures, you can incur frostbite very quickly,” Brown said. “We‘re putting out a list of reminders on how to dress: layered clothes, gloves, a mask that can cover your face and mouth, hats … even if you were to have a car break down for a few minutes, in these kind of conditions, that can be life-threatening.”Regarding students that do not have resources to purchase proper winter attire, Browne stated that the University will step in.“If rectors — or anybody — were to bring this to our attention, we would address it,” Browne said.Browne also stated that campus security and NDSP will be on regular patrol and will intervene to ensure student safety.“Our police and fire personnel will still be patrolling — and if they see somebody who’s out and not properly attired or … doing something stupid, then they would intervene for their safety’s sake,” Brown said. “If we see any engagement in any activity that puts [students] at risk, then we’ll intervene. Police are prepared to intervene.”According to an email from Dennis Brown, assistant vice president for news and media relations, this is the 11th time in Notre Dame’s history that the University closed due to severe weather.The last time Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s closed was Jan. 27-28, 2014. Due to extreme weather conditions, Notre Dame will be closed 7 p.m. Tuesday through 1 p.m. Thursday, according to vice president for public affair and communications Paul Browne. Saint Mary’s will be closed 6 p.m. Tuesday and will resume with normal operating hours on Friday, according to an email from vice president for student affairs, Karen Johnson. Holy Cross will be closed Tuesday at 5 p.m. through Thursday, vice president for finance Monica Markovich said in an email.Browne said both dining halls and select campus buildings will remain open. At Saint Mary’s, Noble Family Dining Hall and Cyber Cafe will remain open, but Cushwa Leighton Library and Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex will be closed. Blinkie Service will not operate Tuesday through Thursday, and will resume Friday evening, according to the email. Saint Mary’s Campus Safety will also not offer any off-campus pickups.last_img read more

Band president reflects on unusual season

first_imgTags: Clemson, covid adjustments, Notre Dame Marching Band Monday evening, in a closed stadium rehearsal, the full Notre Dame marching band took the field to prepare videos of some of their musical selections. The band recorded a program for a pregame and halftime show, which will hopefully be shown in-stadium when the Irish take on the Clemson Tigers on Saturday.“It was actually the first rehearsal we’ve had where the entire, whole 400-person band has been together,” senior Kilian Vidourek, president of the band, said. Until that point, he said, the band had been split up into Blue and Gold sections that practiced on alternating days.“Not every band is even performing like this. So the fact that we were even able to get at least one show on the field in some capacity is pretty remarkable,” Vidourek said. “It was always just to give us this one last thing to come together. That’s all we’ve wanted all year, is to be on the field and play.”Vidourek said the band will also be marching from the Golden Dome to Notre Dame Stadium before the game Saturday, another tradition they have been unable to uphold because of COVID-19. In addition, he said, they will be performing for College Game Day in the stadium Saturday morning.Vidourek said he was glad the band was able to have the experience of practicing together ahead of this. “It was really cool to have everybody there, like back in the good old days,” he said. “A lot of our seniors got emotional towards the end.”When asked what the biggest struggle has been for the program this year, Vidourek said the morale of the group.“Usually band is this super, almost weirdly tight knit group of sections and traditions and events. We’re always hanging out with each other,” Vidourek said. “There’s not as many social events outside of band. We’re all taking every necessary step to be safe.”This, Vidourek said, is why he was especially glad the band was able to practice together. “It’s nice that we have this game and have that rehearsal to channel our energy and effort into,” he said.Vidourek said the band has also been trying to keep up their section and pregame traditions as best they can. One such tradition involves section rivalries that are usually played out at South Dining Hall with competitions. “We still do a very watered down version over Zoom,” Vidourek said. “We’re finding creative ways to make it all happen.”This is also the band’s 175th anniversary, which is cause for celebration with the program. “The kids in band 175 are the most tenacious and strongest and most devoted,” Vidourek said. “I think that they’re just happy to play their instrument and play the Fight Song, and be with each other and be in the band, to be one of the only bands that are doing it, and doing it correctly. So many other bands are probably jealous that we get to come together.”The COVID-19 pandemic has been especially hard on the seniors, he said.“My favorite band memories are the worst football games,” Vidourek said. “There’s something really humbling about going in somewhere, being with the band and taking a loss, and recognizing who you are in the face of losses. It’s so easy to win, but it’s really hard to lose. … It’s a wakeup call to realize it’s not about the victory. It’s not about playing the victory clog, saying you won the game. It’s about the band coming together and knowing that there’s more tomorrow to do.”Vidourek said this season has been like this realization about losses.“This year has been my favorite year in band,” he said. “You have to put in so much more to get the same experience out of it, and it’s been so rewarding to refigure out how to be a band member.”He said that the game Saturday is the perfect way to end the season. “I think this game is a giant culmination of all that hard work,” Vidourek said. “If we pull off this win, and the band can be super loud and get in their faces with all this great music, then I’ll cry.”last_img read more

Audobon Community Nature Center Hosting Little Explorers Program

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Max Pixel Stock Image.KIANTONE – When the leaves fall off a plant, what is left behind? Does every tree and plant lose its leaves in the winter?Adults and the three to eight-year-old child(ren) in your life can learn about “Evergreens and Conifers” at Audubon Community Nature Center’s Little Explorers, Saturday, December 12 10-11:30 a.m.Explore different trees and plants and figure out how they survive during these colder months. Along the way, learn what it means to be an evergreen, which trees are known as conifers, and which plants might be both.After an indoor lesson, attendees will head outside to find plant skeletons, identify evergreens and conifers, and look for evidence of the ways plants provide forest animals with the resources they need to survive the winter. A snack is provided after the walk and a craft is offered if there is time.Since the program takes place rain or shine,  officials say to be sure to dress for the weather.Audubon’s COVID-19 safety precautions require face coverings for all visitors ages 3 and up for indoor programs. Face coverings are also required when attendees cannot maintain physical distance outdoors, so plan to have one available.The fee for the program is $8 for adults, $6 for children and Nature Center members.Make reservations by Thursday, December 10, 2020, by calling (716) 569-2345 during business hours or by going to AudubonCNC.org and clicking on “Register for a Program.”The 2020 Little Explorers series is sponsored by Univera Healthcare. Little Explorers is presented on the second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m.Audubon Community Nature Center is located at 1600 Riverside Road, one-quarter mile east of Route 62 between Jamestown, N.Y., and Warren, Pa.The first floor of the Nature Center building, including the Blue Heron Gift Shop, live animals, and the 2020 Nature Photography Contest winning photographs, is open to the public Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Because not all of the building is accessible, admission is by donation only.You are welcome to visit the 600-acre nature preserve from dawn to dusk daily. While practicing safe social distancing measures, you can enjoy the grounds and six miles of trails, and view Liberty, Audubon’s non-releasable Bald Eagle.To learn more about Audubon and its many programs, call (716) 569-2345 during business hours, visit AudubonCNC.org, or find Audubon Community Nature Center on Facebooklast_img read more

Statewide COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Underway

first_imgPexels Stock Image.ALBANY – Local health departments have started receiving COVID-19 vaccines for healthcare workers across New York State.Governor Andrew Cuomo said statewide 3,762 sites have been identified for vaccine distribution, but currently, only 636 sites have been activated.He says as of Tuesday, 900,000 vaccines have been distributed for 2.1 million healthcare workers.Hospitals that do not distribute their doses by the end of the week could get fined. “They are distributing vaccines to the healthcare workers along with the hospitals. So healthcare workers can either go to the hospitals… or they can go to 600 sites that are across the state,” said the Governor.Meanwhile, some local health departments across the state say more communication and partnership with localities is key to building out the infrastructure to get things done quicker.An aide to the Governor said the state is working on a public dashboard for vaccine data.He also said the goal is to have all nursing home residents receive their first dose of the vaccine within the next two weeks. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Broadway Debut in The Real Thing

first_img The Real Thing Gyllenhaal’s stage credits include Closer, Anthony and Cleopatra, Three Sisters and Homebody/Kabul. Her screen credits include Crazy Heart, Secretary, Waterland, Cecil B. Demented, Donnie Darko, Sherrybaby, Happy Endings, Dark Knight, Away We Go, World Trade Center, Stranger Than Fiction, Mona Lisa Smile, Adaptation, Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang and White House Down. She will soon be seen in the upcoming Frank and The Honourable. Related Shows The Real Thing centers on Henry (McGregor), a successful playwright, who is unhappily married to Charlotte, the lead actress in his current play about a marriage on the verge of collapse. When Henry’s affair with their friend Annie (Gyllenhaal) threatens to destroy his own marriage, he discovers that life has started imitating art. After Annie leaves her husband so she and Henry can begin a new life together, he can’t help but wonder whether their love is fiction or the real thing. The Tony-winning play explores relationships, fidelity and the passions that often blur our perception of love. View Commentscenter_img The full cast and design team for The Real Thing will be announced shortly. Prepare to be seduced all over again! Oscar nominee Maggie Gyllenhaal is set to make her Broadway debut starring opposite the previously announced Ewan McGregor in Tom Stoppard’s Tony-winning play The Real Thing. Directed by Sam Gold, the Roundabout production will begin performances on October 2 and officially open on October 30. The limited engagement is scheduled to play through January 4, 2015 at the American Airlines Theatre. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

Tony Poll Top Three: Fans Are Fuming Over If/Then’s Tony Snub!

first_img 3. Daniel Radcliffe for Best Actor in a Play – 11% Radcliffe delivers a stellar performance in The Cripple of Inishmaan as Billy, not that the nominators seemed to notice. Or ever seem to notice—this is the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner’s third time on the Great White Way boards, and the third time he’s been given the Tony cold shoulder. The production received a total of six nominations, including Best Revival of a Play and Best Featured Actress in a Play for Sarah Greene, but apparently there’s no magic spell for receiving a nod for this leading man. The 2014 Tony nominations were announced on April 29, and while we’re eagerly cheering on the likes of Neil Patrick Harris, Audra McDonald and A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder, there were a number of shows and performers that were left behind. (Seriously, only four Best Musical nominees when they could have picked five? Don’t get us started!) We asked fans which Tony snub they’re fuming over most. The results are in, and here’s what you had to say. Still angry? We don’t blame you. Show those nominators how it’s done by choosing the Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards nominees! View Comments 1. If/Then for Best Musical – 16% As Elizabeth would say/belt, “What the f*ck?!” Don’t get us wrong, we’re happy for all of the nominees, but it’s painful to see such a beautiful and original musical get left behind. Sure, past Tony winners Idina Menzel and composing team Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey may have been nominated this year for their work, but where’s the love for the show? Come on, there’s an empty spot for a Best Musical nominee! 2. The Bridges of Madison County for Best Musical – 14% We cried our eyes out at the show, and now we’re reliving the heartbreak after this snub. While we’re at it, where’s Steven Pasquale on the list?! And did we mention that there’s a fifth spot left open on the list of Best Musical nominees? (Clearly, we’re not over it.) At least we can take solace in the tuner’s four nominations, including Best Original Score for Jason Robert Brown and Best Actress in a Musical for Kelli O’Hara.last_img read more

Jason Biggs & Bryce Pinkham Will Join Elisabeth Moss in The Heidi Chronicles

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on May 3, 2015 Bryce Pinkham Related Shows View Comments Orange is the New Black’s Jason Biggs and A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder’s Bryce Pinkham will join the previously reported Mad Men’s Elisabeth Moss in the now confirmed revival of Wendy Wasserstein’s The Heidi Chronicles on the Great White Way. The production, directed by Pam MacKinnon, will begin rehearsals in January and open in early March 2015. Bad Jews’ Tracee Chimo will play a number of supporting roles.Biggs will take on the role of Scoop Rosenbaum, a writer who has a long flirtation with Heidi. His Broadway credits include The Play What I Wrote, The Graduate and Conversations With My Father. His additional screen credits include the American Pie series, Jersey Girl, Anything Else, Saving Silverman, My Best Friend’s Girl and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Pinkham will play Peter Patrone, Heidi’s gay best friend. He received a Tony nod for Gentleman’s Guide; his other Great White Way credits include Ghost and Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson. Chimo will play the roles of Fran, Molly, Betsy and April. She has previously appeared on Broadway in Harvey and Irena’s Vow.The Heidi Chronicles won both the Tony and the Pulitzer in 1989. This is the first revival since the original production shuttered in 1990. The show spans over 20 years, following Heidi Holland (Moss) from high school to her career as an art historian and how she copes with feminisim, men, politics and motherhood.The creative team will include scenic design by John Lee Beatty and costume design by Jessica Pabst. Theater, dates and additional casting will be announced later. Star Files The Heidi Chronicleslast_img read more